Senate votes to force non-union members to pay 85% of union dues, 8-21, 2013

 

REJECTED

in the State Senate on February 6, 2013 by a vote of

8-21 

The Overall Bill: This bill proposes to require payment of agency fees by teachers, school administrators, and municipal employees who are not members of a labor organization recognized as the exclusive bargaining agent. In addition, it would confirm explicitly that agency fees cannot be used for any purpose other than in connection with collective bargaining. (Read the Bill)

The Bray Amendment: Offered by Sen. Christopher Bray (D-Addison), this amendment would have added and changed language in the bill to reflect that, “The fee shall not exceed 49 percent of the amount payable as dues by members of the employee organization,” reducing the amount required by the original bill of a payment equal to 85% of union dues.

Analysis: While forcing non-union members to pay the unions 49% is less less offensive than the 85%, this vote raises a fundamental question regarding the nature of the number itself. If the bill “confirms explicitly [emphasis added] that agency fees cannot be used for any other purpose than in connection with collective bargaining,” shouldn’t the senators have determined definitively what percentage of union dues goes toward these activities and used that number? Or, are they just pulling numbers out of a hat?

Senate Journal, Friday, February 6, 2013. (Read the Journal)


How They Voted

Timothy Ashe (D/P-Chittenden) NO
Claire Ayer (D-Addison) YES
Philip Baruth (D-Chittenden) NO
Joseph Benning (R-Caledonia) YES
Christopher Bray (D-Addison) YES
John Campbell (D-Windsor) PRESIDING
Donald Collins (D-Franklin) NO
Ann Cummings (D-Washington) NO
William Doyle (R-Washington) NO
Margaret Flory (R-Rutland) YES
Sally Fox (D-Chittenden) NO
Eldred French (D-Rutland) NO
Peter Galbraith (D-Windham) NO
Robert Hartwell (D-Bennington) NO
M. Jane Kitchel (D-Caledonia) NO
Virginia Lyons (D-Chittenden) NO
Mark MacDonald (D-Orange) NO
Richard Mazza (D-Chittenden-Grand Isle) YES
Norman McAllister (R-Franklin) YES
Richard McCormack (D-Windsor) NO
Kevin Mullin (R-Rutland) NO
Alice Nitka (D-Windsor District) YES
Anthony Pollina (P/D/W-Washington) NO
John Rodgers (D-Essex-Orleans) YES
Richard Sears (D-Bennington) NO
Diane Snelling (R-Chittenden) NO
Robert Starr (D-Essex-Orleans) NO
Richard Westman (R-Lamoille) NO
Jeanette White (D-Windham) NO
David Zuckerman (P-Chittenden) NO

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