Roll Call! Senate Votes for $15 Minimum Wage (19-8), 2019

PASSED
in the State Senate on February 22, 2019 by a vote of
19-8 
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Purpose: To mandate that the state minimum wage be increased to $15 per hour by 2024.
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AnalysisThe current minimum wage in Vermont (2019) is $10.78, making it already one of the highest minimum wages in the country. S.23 would increase the state minimum wage to $13.10 in 2022, $14.05 in 2023, and to $15 by January 1, 2024 — nearly a 40% total increase, and more than double neighboring New Hampshire’s $7.25 minimum wage.
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Those voting YES believe raising the wage will benefit low income earners.
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Those voting NO believe the economic damage caused by raising Vermont’s minimum wage so much so fast will outweigh any potential benefits, will unduly burden small and marginal businesses, will cause low income workers to lose more in benefits than they would gain in wages, disadvantage the least skilled workers, and harm the majority of poor Vermonters, who live on fixed incomes and do not earn wages.
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Senate Journal, February 22, 2019. “Thereupon, third reading of the bill was ordered on a roll call, Yeas 19, Nays 8.” (Read the Journal, p. 186-192)
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Related:
Study: $15 Minimum Wage = Massive Job Losses in Key VT Industries
$15 Minimum Wage Would Impact Medicaid/Medicare costs by $50 million
Senior Citizens Would Get Hit Hardest by a $15 Minimum Wage
The $15 Minimum Wage Will Be Bad for Young Families

How They Voted

Timothy Ashe (D/P-Chittenden) – PRESIDING
Becca Balint (D-Windham) – YES
Philip Baruth (D-Chittenden) – ABSENT
Joseph Benning (R-Caledonia) – NO
Christopher Bray (D-Addison) – YES
Randy Brock (R-Franklin) – NO
Brian Campion (D-Bennington) – YES
Alison Clarkson (D-Windsor) – YES
Brian Collamore (R-Rutland) – NO
Ann Cummings (D-Washington) – YES
Ruth Hardy (D-Addison) – YES
Cheryl Hooker (D-Rutland) – YES
Debbie Ingram (D-Chittendent) – YES
M. Jane Kitchel (D-Caledonia) – YES
Virginia Lyons (D-Chittenden) – YES
Mark MacDonald (D-Orange) – YES
Richard Mazza (D-Chittenden-Grand Isle) – YES
Richard McCormack (D-Windsor) – YES
James McNeil (R-Rutland) – NO
Alice Nitka (D-Windsor District) – YES
Corey Parent (R-Franklin) – NO
Chris Pearson (P-Chittenden) – YES
Andrew Perchlik (D-Washington) – ABSENT
Anthony Pollina (P/D/W-Washington) – YES
John Rodgers (D-Essex-Orleans) – NO
Richard Sears (D-Bennington) – YES
Michael Sirotkin (D-Chittenden) – YES
Robert Starr (D-Essex-Orleans) – NO
Richard Westman (R-Lamoille) – NO
Jeanette White (D-Windham) – YES

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