Don’t Make the Internet Safe for Monopolies

by Tom Evslin

Last month I went to Washington to argue against regulating Internet access as if it were phone service. Twenty years ago I was there for the same reason. My concern now as it was then is that such regulation will damage the economy and reduce opportunity by stifling innovation and protecting the current dominant players from the startups which would otherwise threaten them.

At that time the proponents of Internet regulation were most regional monopoly telephone companies, who were regulated themselves (and very comfortable living in a regulated environment). The then small Internet industry (including me) argued that startups were not monopolies and could not afford the batteries of lobbyists and regulatory compliance lawyers needed to survive in a regulated world. “Imagine,” we said, “if each new Internet app had to be approved by some commission or another”.

Fortunately Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chair Reed Hundt, a Democrat appointed by Bill Clinton, and a majority of commissioners agreed with us. The Commission policy on Internet regulation became one of forbearance. The monopolists were right to worry. The Internet was disruptive. If they had won, there would be no such thing as Skype or Vonage; calls to China would still be $3.00 minute; and 800 numbers might still be more important than websites for shopping. Google, Netflix, Facebook, and Amazon wouldn’t be the companies they are today.

Hundt’s successor William Kennard, also appointed by Clinton, listened carefully to all arguments and continued the policy of benign forbearance. Innovation flourished. When Bush was elected,  Internet folk were afraid that his FCC appointees would be more responsive to telco lobbying. We could no longer argue that the Internet was a fledgling industry but could and did argue the public benefits of innovation and rapidly evolving business models. Michael Powell, Bush’s first appointee as FCC Chair, and the Commission debated and then issued the “Pulver Order” declaring that Voice over IP was not a telecommunications service. That meant in practice that the FCC, whose mandate only extends to telephony services, would have no reason to regulate the Internet.

The FCC did NOT regulate the Internet from then until now. However, in the waning days of the Obama administration, the FCC promulgated a regulation saying that Internet access is a telecommunications service (regardless of whether voice over IP is involved.). Therefor the FCC has the right to regulate Internet access as it used to regulate monopoly phone service. Big reversal.

Those who now want regulation are Google, Facebook, and other major Internet players. They are good marketers so this regulation is called “Net Neutrality”. Who could be against a neutral Internet where all bits are equal? Ironically it is the telcos and cable companies (ISPs) who are on the other side and against reregulation; they are the ones who will be regulated.

There are three major things wrong with the “Net Neutrality” regulations as promulgated:

  1. All users of the Internet as well as the economy itself will suffer if regulation is used to throttle innovation – that’s as true now as it ever was.
  2. This regulation protects the powerhouse incumbents – Google, Facebook et al – from effective and needed competition. It protects them on one side from rich ISPs (why?) and on the other side from would be new providers of Internet access (think mesh networks, access from drones, whatever) who won’t be able to satisfy the regulations made for the technologies they are obsoleting.
  3. There is probably no legal justification for the FCC regulating the Internet. FCC has jurisdiction over basic telecommunications service. They said the Internet isn’t such a service for years; just saying it is all of a sudden a basic telecommunications service doesn’t make it so.

Google may yet regret its call for regulation of any part of the Internet value chain. A Wall Street Journal story last week says that Google is working on an ad-blocking filter for its Chrome browser. Will the FCC next declare browsers a telecommunication service and require browser neutrality?

With all due respect to many people I respect who support the “Net Neutrality” regulations, I’m as much against regulating the Internet now as I was 20 years ago although I no longer have any direct financial interest except as a consumer. I hope both that the legal challenge to this extension of the FCC’s reach will continue and that the current FCC will undo the harm that its immediate predecessors did and return to the policy which has so successfully supported economic growth and innovation for the last twenty years.

See https://www.bna.com/pai-engages-silicon-n57982087000/ for a Bloomberg story on this issue.

– Tom Evslin is a retired CEO, novelist, and consultant. He served as Vermont Transportation Secretary and as Chief Recovery Officer (aka Stimulus Czar) following the 2007 recession. This piece is re-printed with permission from his blog, Fractals of Change (http://blog.tomevslin.com/).

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

David Usher July 16, 2017 at 3:30 pm

Tom,

Thanks for making the case in Washington and providing the needed history that regulating the internet is a bad idea. I fully agree with your position and rationale. To regulate the internet as telephony was back in the day would be very bad public policy in these times. “Net Neutrality” is merely a spin phrase to capture the minds and emotions of those who should know better.

Reply

Jim Bulmer July 16, 2017 at 10:52 pm

It’s almost an iron clad rule that if you want something screwed up, bring in the government regulators, and puff – done. As President Reagan said many years ago, “the 11 most dangerous words in the English language are ‘I’m from the Federal Government , and I’m here to help you’ “. Oh how true.

Reply

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post:

About Us

The Ethan Allen Institute is Vermont’s free-market public policy research and education organization. Founded in 1993, we are one of fifty-plus similar but independent state-level, public policy organizations around the country which exchange ideas and information through the State Policy Network.
Read more...

Latest News

William Galston on Sanders’ single payer

by John McClaughry William Galston, a White House advisor in the Clinton years, is the thoughtful moderate Democrat columnist for the Wall Street Journal. He had a piece...

Sanderscare: What is Bernie Thinking?

by David Flemming Once again, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has decided to beat the drum for single-payer healthcare (Medicare for All!) Will he ever realize he’s beating a...

Mathis Forgets G.I. Bill Was A Voucher Program

by Bruce Buxton This piece is a response to an Op-Ed by William Mathis of the Vermont State School Board, which can be read HERE.  Mr. Mathis is...

Are We Paying Parents to Keep Kids In Poverty?

by Rob Roper An article in Seven Days reminded us that back in 2007 the Vermont legislature set a goal to cut child poverty in half in ten...

Advocate: Raise Minimum Wage Till It Hurts!

by David Flemming On Sept. 6, David Cooper of the Economic Policy Institute (a Left leaning, Washington-based think tank founded by a coalition of eight labor unions) testified...

Video