Commentary: Montpelier Tax Spree Is Inexcusable (May, 2015)

by Wendy WiltonWendy Rotator Card

The 2015 Doyle poll and others leading up to the 2014 election indicated the majority of Vermonters were stretched to their tax limit for property and income taxes. The gubernatorial race was evidence of this outrage.

In the last two weeks the majority of legislators in the Vermont House voted to ignore the concerns of their constituents and went on a taxation spree. This action is inexplicable given the financial predicament of the state due to shrinking revenues and soft economic growth.  It appears the consensus and camaraderie of their committee meant more to them than the fiscal future of the state and its people.

The majority in the House passed or is likely to pass a collection of bills increasing taxes $130 million mainly on the middle class.  These tax increases come from a new tax bill (H.489), increases in education spending, environmental taxes, increased fees, a sugar-sweetened beverage tax, and a big increase to the general fund budget which will mean higher income taxes.

The appropriation bill (H.490) increases state spending by $68 million, or 4.8%–well beyond the economic growth rate.  Worse, this budget has $24 million in one-time funds baked-in to shore up this budget increase, which will need to be found in future years.  This is a pattern the governor and legislature have repeated for several years which is how we got into this jam.

If the Senate agrees, the proposals will increase income taxes on middle income Vermonters by nearly 10%, according to former Tax Commissioner Tom Pelham’s analysis, not including property taxes.  The number of ‘wealthy’ Vermont taxpayers is relatively small and insufficient to carry this burden—debunking the myth that taxing the rich is a solution.  Vermont’s middle-incomers are closing in on their retirement years and will be making choices about where retirement will be sustainable.  Will it be here?

The legislature must consider the impacts of these decisions not just for this year but for the years ensuing.  Find out how your legislators voted at ethanallen.org under Roll Calls.  They must be held accountable for these actions by expressing your outrage to them individually.

– Wendy Wilton, is treasurer for the City of Rutland, and a member of the Ethan Allen Institute board of directors.

{ 0 comments… add one now }

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post:

About Us

The Ethan Allen Institute is Vermont’s free-market public policy research and education organization. Founded in 1993, we are one of fifty-plus similar but independent state-level, public policy organizations around the country which exchange ideas and information through the State Policy Network.
Read more...

Latest News

A Response to “Who’s Really Politicizing Our Kids”

June 13, 2019 by Rob Roper The following is in response to a letter that appeared in the Caledonian Record on June 10th by Steven Isham.  To the...

VPIRG’s Plastic Agenda

June 12, 2019 By John McClaughry The plastic bag ban is sitting on Gov. Phil Scott’s desk. If he signs it, Statehouse Chronicle writer Guy Page reports, a working...

The Blittersdorf Special

June 11, 2019 By John McClaughry Remember the Champlain Flyer? That was Howard Dean’s commuter train that ran 13 miles from Charlotte to Burlington. After three years’ operation...

Roll Call! Senate Blocks Amendment to Remove Insurance Innovation from Bill (7-22), 2019

S.131 – AN ACT RELATING TO INSURANCE AND SECURITIES (BARUTH AMENDMENT) FAILED in the State Senate on April 3, 2019 by a vote of  7-22  . Purpose: The Amendment called for removing...

California Prison Drugs

June 7, 2019 By John McClaughry Steven Greenhut, writing in the Orange County (California) Register, makes an interesting point about drugs in prisons. He quotes a San Francisco...

Video